Kuveždin Monastery

Kuveždin Monastery

Kuveždin Monastery, with the church dedicated to Saint Sava, belongs to the only three existing churches dedicated to Saint Sava of Serbia in the world. Monastery lies on the southwestern part of Fruška Gora Mountain, 1 km north of the village of Divoš, on the road connecting Beočin and Erdevik. Late 17th-century tradition says that Kuveždin Monastery was founded by military commander and last Serbian Despot Stefan Štiljanović in 1520. In the 17th century, monks from the monasteries of Vinča and Slanci (near Belgrade) on the run from the Turks found refuge in the Kuveždin Monastery, bringing with them a variety of treasures and manuscripts.

In the first half of the 19th century, a three-store Baroque steeple and three-sided monastic residential buildings (konaci) were built, the latter with elements of a Classical architectural style, while the old two-domed monastery church was replaced with a new structure. The iconostasis in the old church of Kuveždin Monastery was painted by Janko Halkozović in 1722, whole the iconostasis for the new church was completed by Pavle Simić in the mid-19th century. The Baroque chapel in the Monastery graveyard was built in 1788, on the top of the hill. The Kuveždin Monastery was originally male monastic community to become a nunnery just before the Second World War. At that time, the Kuveždin Monastery was, in terms of the number of nuns, one of the largest Serbian monasteries. There were numerous nuns from Russia who found their sanctuary in Kuvezdin Monastery after they were forced to leave Russia, due to the October Revolution. After the Second World War the Kuveždin Monastery was abandoned, with only the monastery chapel, which houses the preserved portions of the iconostasis, remaining intact. In recent years Kuveždin Monastery experiences thorough reconstruction and monastic community has been re-established.

 

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